Bullbuster In Action:


"Capt. Norm's No-No's" Part 1


Author: Bullbuster Team

Big Game Fishing Hawaii Tips

When the Bullbuster Team purchased the domain for "Big Game Fishing The World"  we thought, there is no way that this could be true.  This was once a legends website. Well, it turned out to be true and today we have restored some of the works of legendary Capt. Norm Isaac's.  We take no credit for what you are about to read but instead insist on honoring a legend who helped shaped our sport. 

INSIDE BIG GAME FISHING, HAWAII with Capt. Norm Isaacs  




After all my years of pushing around a charterboat, I'm still amazed at some of the things folks do, things that can be very destructive to the boat or the equipment. When someone pulls one of these black-belt blunders, my first thought, which is frequently not of the warmest nature, is generally something like, "What a jerk! Doesn't he realize blah, blah, blah, "


My second thought is, "No, he doesn't, and why should he?" Most of my customers haven't been working on a boat every day for the last umpteen years. If they had been, they would likely know better than to do whatever it was they did; but, then they probably couldn't afford to be chartering a boat. By the way, ladies, don't feel left out. The particular arena to which I'm referring is not gender exclusive. Women as well as their male counterparts are equally adept at unknowingly causing tight jaws on the bridge.


To the best of my knowledge, nobody has ever compiled a list of no-no's for people who are either chartering a boat or have been invited aboard as a guest. The result of not knowing some of these faux pas can range from simply not getting invited back to getting to spend all day where the fish aren't and rough seas are, generally with the boat abeam to the sea to achieve maximum discomfort due to the enhanced rolling action.

"there are a few hall-of-fame screw-ups that most of us have seen over and over... I thought I would jot down a few tips on what not to do"

A complete list would be impossible, plus I would imagine every skipper with any amount of time at sea has a few personal pet peeves. Some of these would be specific to his boat and some specific to his personality. However, there are a few hall-of-fame screw-ups that most of us see over and over, so I thought I'd jot down a few tips on what not to do in this article and try to toss in a few more next time.

"Every so often a customer feels compelled to ... to leap into the air and land flat-footed ... If there happens to be a hatch on the deck ... that seems to be the target of choice. " 

I guess a good starting point is on the dock before ever mounting up for the trip. Black-soled shoes - ouch! Some of the footwear people show up wearing I'm positive has been soled with recycled car tires. The black marks they leave on the deck spell countless hours of scrubbing by somebody, often to no avail. It's not a good way to stretch your time on the water when the crew knows they have an extra hour or two tacked onto the cleanup while you're back at the hotel having a cool one.

"You will be less likely to hurt yourself.. the crew will appreciate your not leaving a trail of destruction."

Coming aboard seems to present another opportunity for a colossal goof. Embarkment should be orderly and under control. That sounds simple enough; however, it seems every so often one of the passengers or anglers feels compelled to demonstrate his ability to leap into the air and land flat-footed on the deck. If there happens to be a hatch on the deck or a weak spot, that seems to be the target of choice. 

"Another application enhanced by "gently" is... putting a rod into a rod holder... the inexperienced hand will jab the rod... like.. a pitchfork in a bail of hay"

If Lady Luck is smiling, the jumper doesn't end up butt-deep in the boat with both feet firmly planted on the hull after going through the deck. While you're on board, move gently and deliberately. You'll be less likely to hurt yourself, and the crew will appreciate your not leaving a trail of destruction that they will have to repair later.

"When the fish pulls the tip down the rod butt may come between your legs... its hard to tell a good fish story with a high squeaky voice"

Another application enhanced by "gently" is when you're putting a rod into a rod holder. This applies to any rod, but it is a little more critical with larger gear. Firing a rod into a holder will frequently knock the pin right out of the bottom of the holder. The rod butts are usually metal, as is the pin in the bottom of the rod holder. Sometimes, it seems that if the pin doesn't engage the slot in the rod butt, the inexperienced hand will jab the rod butt in the holder a time or two -- like he's trying to stick a pitchfork in a bale of hay. Gently rotating the rod butt slightly from side to side will help the pin find the slot and keep pin replacement off the to-do list on the crew's next day off.

"Puting a large unsightly scratch across a beautifully finished seat of a $10,000 fighting chair definitely costs you big time when it comes to "cool" points"

Speaking of rods and deliberate moves, when you transfer a rod from a holder to the fighting chair to fight the fish, be sure to keep the rod butt under control. If you don't, a couple of things - both bad - are likely to happen. One, when the fish pulls the tip down, the rod butt may come up between your legs. It's hard to tell a good fish story with a high squeaky voice, which is probably what you will be left with if this happens. Two, and even worse than number one, instead of placing the rod butt into the chair gimbals it may go onto the three coats of varnish on the seat of the chair. If this happens, you will have made an impression on your crew that they are unlikely to forget (or forgive). Putting a large unsightly scratch across a beautifully finished seat of a $10,000 fighting chair definitely costs you big time when it comes to "cool" points. Even if the chair isn't that expensive, it still probably means a lot to its owner and beating it up with the rod butt would be paramount to picking on his first born.

Believe me, I haven't even scratched the surface as far as "crew nightmare" tips are concerned; but having run out of time and space, these will have to do as a starter.

Tight Lines . . . . . Norm.

We Help Millions Of Anglers Spend More Time Fishing

We hope that you enjoyed this article on the Bullbuster Community.  It is our mission to help millions of anglers spend more time fishing and that starts with YOU!

 

Tour Our Factory Below

Buy Your Fishing Line Brand Direct Online Now!


Back